London in literature

  1. Which building, now the administrative centre of University College London but then a part of the Ministry of Information, was the model for the Ministry of Truth in George Orwell’s 1948 novel Nineteen Eighty-Four?
  2. In which classic work of English literature do the main characters set out on a journey beginning from the Tabard Inn in Southwark?
  3. Which comic novel of 1892 pokes fun at the uneventful life of Charles Pooter, a clerk in the City who has just purchased a new house in Holloway?
  4. Which literary character, the epitome of an upper class twit, was a member of the fictional Drones Club in London?
  5. At 13-14 Portsmouth Street, Holborn, sits a shop owned by the London School of Economics. It shares its name with, and may have been the inspiration for, a famous 1840 novel set in London. Which novel?
  6. Which London thoroughfare gives its name to a 2004 novel by Monica Ali, about the life of a young Bangladeshi woman who comes to London to marry an older man.
  7. The Cormoran Strike crime novels of Robert Galbraith are set primarily in London, with his office being located on Denmark Street. Robert Galbraith is a pseudonym, and the works are really by which author?
  8. Which scientific London landmark is blown up in the course of Joseph Conrad’s 1907 novel The Secret Agent?
  9. In Jules Verne’s “Around The World In 80 Days”, the challenge of circumnavigating the globe in 80 days is set to Phileas Fogg by his friends at which private members’ club in London?
  10. In Nick Hornby’s 1992 memoir Fever Pitch, he recounts going to see football matches, and the events in his life at the time of the matches. Which club’s matches does the book focus on?

Answers below (scroll down)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. Which building, now the administrative centre of University College London but then a part of the Ministry of Information, was the model for the Ministry of Truth in George Orwell’s 1948 novel Nineteen Eighty-Four?
    A: Senate House
  2. In which classic work of English literature do the main characters set out on a journey beginning from the Tabard Inn in Southwark?
    A: The Canterbury Tales
  3. Which comic novel of 1892 pokes fun at the uneventful life of Charles Pooter, a clerk in the City who has just purchased a new house in Holloway?
    A: Diary of A Nobody
  4. Which literary character, the epitome of an upper class twit, was a member of the fictional Drones Club in London?
    A: Bertie Wooster
  5. At 13-14 Portsmouth Street, Holborn, sits a shop owned by the London School of Economics. It shares its name with, and may have been the inspiration for, a famous 1840 novel set in London. Which novel?
    A: The Old Curiosity Shop
  6. Which London thoroughfare gives its name to a 2004 novel by Monica Ali, about the life of a young Bangladeshi woman who comes to London to marry an older man.
    A: Brick Lane
  7. The Cormoran Strike crime novels of Robert Galbraith are set primarily in London, with his office being located on Denmark Street. Robert Galbraith is a pseudonym, and the works are really by which author?
    A: J.K. Rowling
  8. Which scientific London landmark is blown up in the course of Joseph Conrad’s 1907 novel The Secret Agent?
    A: The Greenwich Observatory
  9. In Jules Verne’s “Around The World In 80 Days”, the challenge of circumnavigating the globe in 80 days is set to Phileas Fogg by his friends at which private members’ club in London?
    A: The Reform Club
  10. In Nick Hornby’s 1992 memoir Fever Pitch, he recounts going to see football matches, and the events in his life at the time of the matches. Which club’s matches does the book focus on?
    A: Arsenal

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